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Gibbons Elm
Edward Gibbons
(Removed 1912)

Tablet on Gibbon's Elm, Winthrop
- Landmarks "in the Old Bay State, pg 334
Annual record of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts. No. 275, 1912/1913, pg 103 - ebook
- Winthrop Public Library
Squaw Sachem Sells Her Land to John Winthrop, from a mural painting by Aiden L. Ripley, 1924 - Winchester Public Library - Edward Gibbons is one of the four men
- Winthrop Public Library
Edward Gibbons land in the "Great Alliotment" - Sidvin Tucker Map, Winthrop Public Library




Edward Gibbons (1600-1654)
- Annual record of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts. No. 275, 1912/1913, pg 103 - ebook
"The old Gibbons elm, which had stood on Winthrop Street, Winthrop near the Thornton station, for 276 years, was felled July 8, 1912, by order of the selectmen of that town because, in its rapidly decaying condition it had become dangerous to the public."
- Winthrop Days, And A Half Century With The Trees - 1855-1905, Mary Priscilla Griffin, 1905 - (text)
"It is now sometimes called the Gibbon's elm from the fact that it stands on a grant of land made to Edward Gibbons in 1636-37, who was the first white man to own the land. How well do we remember the dark, weather-stained house that stood, nearly a half-century ago, almost under the great elm, with the old well sweep near the door and the old-time flower garden, with its tall bushes of white roses, its huge clumps of rich crimson peonies, and the golden daffodils; its roots of hoarhound, catnip and the rioting, aromatic gil-over-the-ground with its small purple-blue flowers; its current bushes and its apple-trees."
- The Gibbons Elm Tree, Winthrop; Landmarks "in the Old Bay State"
"On January 9, 1634 a grant of fourscore acres of land at "Pullen Poynt," now called Point Shirley was made to Edward Gibbons. On June 12, 1637, eighty acres of upland and marsh were also granted to him. On this last grant of land stands the old tree whose picture is the frontispiece of this book. East of this tree stood the house here pictured. It is said to have been 'a very comfortable farmhouse containing several rooms, some of which were fitted up for the use of his family.'"
- Historic Winthrop, 1630-1902, Charles W. Hall - (text)
"Mr. Edward Gibbons, had a very comfortable farmhouse, somewhere near the great elm at Thornton Park Station. There were several rooms, a part of which were fitted up for the use of his family, although he had a house of more than usual pretension in Boston.'"
- The History of Winthrop Massachusetts - 1630-1952, William H. Clark, 1952 - (text)
"An important early non-resident property owner was Major Edward Gibbons, who built a comfortable farmhouse in the Thornton Park section, about where Winthrop Street and Pleasant Street and Washington Avenue now meet. The Gibbons house was probably one of the largest and better-built structures in Winthrop's early days."
- The Early Massachusetts Press, 1638-1711, Volume 1 - (ebook)
"Edward Gibbons, the third owner of the ship "Planter" was one of the most famous characters in the colony, and was distinguished both in military and business enterprises. His disposition, although of an adventurous and roving nature, was not vicious. After living some time at Hilton's settlement on the Piscataqua River, he joined Morton at Mount Wollaston, attracted as much by the great profits to be obtained by hunting and trading with the Indians as by the open air amusements which were peculiar to Merry Mount."
- The History of Winthrop Massachusetts - 1630-1952, William H. Clark, 1952 (text)
"An important early non-resident property owner was Major Edward Gibbons, who built a comfortable farmhouse in the Thornton Park section, about where Winthrop Street and Pleasant Street and Washington Avenue now meet. The Gibbons house was probably one of the largest and better-built structures in Winthrop's early days."
- The Menotomy Journal, 1637
“Squaw Sachem and Webcowit deed to Jotham Gibbons, (oldest son of Edward Gibbons, who was 3 years old at this time) upon her death all the land she reserved for herself. "This I do without seeking to of him or any of his; but I receiving many kindnesses of them, am willing to acknowledge their many kindnesses by this small gift to their son." Squaw Sachem and Webcowit receive 36 shillings from Edward Gibbons for, "the land between Charlestowne and Wenotomies River."
- Transgressing the Bounds: Subversive Enterprises among the Puritan Elite in Massachusetts, 1620-1692, Louise A. Breen, 2001, pg 131 - (ebook)
“During the 1640s, Artillery Company member Edward Gibbons convinced Bay Colony authorities to intervene in the struggle between Charles LaTour and Charles D’Aulany, two rival claimants to authority and profitable trading forts in French Acadia. Gibbons’ personal financial involvement with the untrustworthy LaTour eventually brought about his economic ruin.”
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