Town Memorials | Winthrop, Massachusetts
HOME Veterans Wars and Forts Civic Schools Street and Corners People
Storefronts Hotels Maps Books Search Sources

Streets and Corners

The most important source of information for this page is Channing Howard's 1950 pamphlet, "Winthrop, Mass. Our Streets, How we got them and their names" (original at the Winthrop Public Library). Click here for a text version.

Adams St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Pricilla Adams (1669-1702), daughter of Deane Winthrop, mother of Priscilla Royall (Adams).
Albert Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street runs through a portion of the 48 acres of land Edward G. Loring (see Loring Rd.) and George B. Emerson (see Emerson Rd.) purchased in Winthrop in 1847.
Almont St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Almont, Locust, and Cross Streets were laid out on "Floyd's Hill" (land owned by Deacon David Floyd (1807-1895)) in 1875. The Floyd family connection to the Winthrop area dates back to Captain John Floyd (1638-1702) who moved with his wife Sarah (Doolittle) in 1680 to Rumney Marsh. (info on Floyd family). Almont St. did not extend more than 4 or 5 house lots east of Cross St. until the late 1890's. (Almont, Michigan was named in 1845 to honor the Mexican soldier and diplomat, Juan Almonte)
Andrew St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Andrew Tewksbury (1739-1814), one of the three sons, along with John and James, of John Tewksbury (1707-1752), an original settler of "Pullen Point." (info on Tewksbury family)
Amelia Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Amelia (Cobb) Belcher (born 1863) was the wife of Henry M. Belcher (born 1860), the youngest child of Thomas Jefferson Belcher (1812-1884) and Hannah (Tewksbury) Belcher. The Belcher family in Winthrop dates back to Jeremiah Belcher (1641-1722) (info on Belcher family).
Argyle St. (Google: Street View, Map)
The street starts at the locaton of the former Argyle stables. The Argyle Hotel was located on the corner of Cliff and Grover avenues.
Atkinson Circle (Google: Street View, Map)
Likely Isaac C. Atkinson (1848-1918). Atkinson Circle first appears on a 1914 map as property owned by bhis wife, Clara M. A. Atkinson (1865-1932). The Atkinson family was involved in the furniture business, first in Maine, then in Boston. Unfortunately the B.A. Atkinson & Co. Furniture business when bankrupt in 1893. The land had been owned by the City of Boston, then purchased and developed by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company in 1883 (see Deane Ave.).
Atlantic St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. Street is laid on land owned by Hermon B. Tewksbury (1827-1905). He was a director on the Boston, Winthrop & Point Shirley Railroad (info on Tewksbury family).
Banks St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Nathaniel P. Banks (1816–1894), an American politician and a Union general during the American Civil War. (see Fort Banks)
Bartlett Rd. (Google: Street View, Map), Bartlett Parkway (Google: Street View, Map)
The Bartlett family in New England dates to the 1600s (info on Bartlett family). Charles L Bartlett (1802-1883), born in Haverhill, moved to Winthrop in 1847. He was active in shipping including working with his brother Edwin, one of the founders of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company (Wikipedia). He was also active in railroads as a Director for the Winthrop Horse Railroad Company. His son, William Francis Bartlett (1840-1876) (Wikipedia), was a Union General in the Civil War (more of W.F. Bartlett).
Bates Ave.. (Google: Street View, Map)
(ch) Joshua Bates (17881864) (Wikipedia) was an international financier who divided his life between the United States and the United Kingdom. He was born in Weymouth, and in 1813 married the daughter of Samuel Sturgis, Lucretia Augusta.
- Edward Bates (1586-1644) was one of the original 15 colonists receiving land on Pullen Point in the Great Allotment of 1638.
Bayou St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Beach Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. One of three streets (Beach Rd., Myrtle Ave., and Hawthorn Ave.) in the Atantic Wave development on the land owned by Herman B. Tewksbury, and developed by David Floyd. The land was situated between Floyd's Hill and Dr. Samuel Ingall's Ocean Spray development.
Beacon St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is laid out on Cottage Hill, formerly Great Head, land purchased in 1878 by William B. Rice (Wikipedia), the co-founder of Rice & Hutchins (Wikipedia), one of largest shoe manufacturers in the United States. The civil engineering firm used for the development was Whitman & Howard. Channing Howard (born 1867), co-founder and a civil engineer, lived in Winthrop. He also was a trustee of the Winthrop Public Library, and author of "Winthrop, Mass. Our Streets, How we got them and their names" and other books on Winthrop and Massachusetts. William B. Rice, and later his son, Fred B. Rice, formed the Winthrop Shore Land Company, and made major land purchases in Winthrop in the late 1800s, including purchasing Winthrop Highlands from the City of Boston.
Beal St. (Google: Street View, Map)
"Beal street was laid out on the Bill Estate by Edmund S. Reed. Beal much easier to say than Bill" (CH). Edmund S. Read was a selectman in the town in 1888. The Bill Family in Winthrop dates back to its earliest settlement. In the late 1600's, James Bill (1615-1681) and his wife Mary Bill (1613-1688), other Bill family members, along with John Winthrop, were owners of most of the land in Winthrop, then part of Boston called Pullen Poynt (also spelled Pulling Point). See "History of the Bill Family".
Belcher St. (Google: Street View, Map)
The Belcher family in New England dates to the 1600s. Jeremiah Belcher came from England in 1635 and settled in Ipswich. His son, also Jeremiah, purchased land in Rumney Marsh (info on Belcher family). Belcher St. was evidently set out during the 1870's to provide quicker access to the Baptist Church from Winthrop to Hermon streets. lt traversed a large tract owned by Samuel Belcher.
Bellevue Ave. (Google: Street View, Map), Bellevue Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
Bellevue in French means beautiful view. The street is part of the Cottage Park section of town (see Cottage Park Rd.) The street follows the boundary line which seperated C.H. Tewksbury's land from Orlando F. Belcher's land.
Billows St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. The street was laid out as part of a development on Point Shirley by Alpheus P. Blake (see Triton Ave.)
Birch Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of two streets named after trees in the Court Park section of town in honor of former land owner, and noted naturalist George B. Emerson (see Emerson Rd.)
Bowdoin St. (Google: Street View, Map)
James Bowdoin II, 2nd Governor of Massachusetts (1726-1790) (Wikipedia) was an owner of land in the area that the street traverses.
Brewster Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
The Brewster family in Massachusetts dates back to Mayflower passenger Willam Brewster (Wikipedia). His son, Jonathan Brewster (Wikipedia) and Love Brewster (Wikipedia) were contemporaries of John Winthrop. Brewster Ave. is on land owned by the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad.
Brookfield Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. The name Brookfield has an English topographic origin as, one who dwelled on a plain by a brook. Alternately, the Brooks family is one of the oldest in Massachusetts ( info on Brooks Family).
Buchanan St. (Google: Street View, Map)
James Buchanan, Jr. (1791–1868) 15th President of the United States (1857–1861) (Wikipedia). Street was laid out about the time of the Civil War.
Buckthorn Terrace (Google: Street View. Map)
Street laid out on former Beacon Villa Estate (see Villa Ave.). Buckthorns are European native shrubs that were brought to this country and are planted commonly as hedges.
Burrill Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
The Burrill family in New England dates to the 1600s with George Burrill reportedly coming over on the Winthrop Fleet. He settled in Lynn and became one of the wealthiest planters in the area. Joseph Burrill, along with Joseph Belcher and John W. Tewksbury, in 1835 petitioned to build a bridge between what was then Chelsea and Pullen Point (now Orient Height and Winthrop). The 570 feet Chelsea Point  toll bridge was finished in 1839.
Central St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is on land that was owned by the Winthrop Land Trust and is one of several that was planned for a development of a portion of the Playstead area (see Playstead)
Centre St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street laid on land owned by Hermon B. Tewksbury (1827-1905). He was a director on the Boston, Winthrop & Point Shirley Railroad.
Chamberlain Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
- John Chamberlain (d. 1753) was the chosen the first Deacon of the Rumney Marsh church in June, 1720. (info on Chamberlain Family)
- Willard N. Chamberlain (d. 1911) was a beef wholesaler in Boston, who in 1896 had a summer house on Grovers Ave., and owned property straddling the street. His business was one of the first in Boston to receive beef dressed in Chicago. Previously cattle had been killed in Brighton.
Charles St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Charles S. Tewksbury (1824-1873) (info on Tewksbury family). Street is laid out on land owned by Charles, who inherited his father John W. Tewksbury's extensive land holdings that included all of Cottage Hill from Short Beach extending over the hill and all the way to the land of Elisha Cutler at Winthrop Beach. 
Chester Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Chester Freeman. The street is laid out on land owned by David Belcher, one of the first selectman, and named for his grandson.
Circuit Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. Street forms a border of the Court Park section of the town (see Emerson Rd. for more on Court Park)
Cliff Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. Street was laid out on land purchased from the City of Boston in 1883 by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company (see Deane Ave.).
Cora St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Mantie Cora Belcher was the granddaughter of Samuel Belcher. See Belcher St.
Coral Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845. (info on Ocean Spray). See also Ingleside Park.
Corinha Beach Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
The road appears on the 1896 town map as an unamed path leading from Sunnyside Ave. to the ocean. The property it runs on is shown as owned by R. Viera Cornilia. Likely a misspelling of Corinha. The 1906 map shows the path running through property of the children of Antonio Viera Corinha Jr. and Rosa Clara Viera (Rebello). Both born in the Azores in the mid 1800's.
Cottage Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.)
Cottage Park Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Street was intially the access road to the the Charles L. Bartlett estate (see Bartlett Rd.). The Bartlett house and land were purchased by Orlando Belcher in 1887, expanded and turned into the Cottage Park Hotel. Ferry service to Boston was available from what would become the Cottage Park Yacht Club. The land also began to be subdivided into indvidual lots.
Court Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Street in the Court Park section of the town (see Emerson Rd. for more on Court Park)
Crescent St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Crescent St. was originally planned to run approximately parallel to Shirley St. on the other side of the narrow gauge railroad track near Winthrop beach. Plots were laid out for development, but only two short sections of the street were built (see Winthrop Playstead).
Crest Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. Street was laid out on land purchased from the City of Boston in 1883 by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company (see Deane Ave.). It was built in 1900 as part of the Metropolitan Park System (see Winthrop Shore Dr.)
Cross St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Cross St. was initially laid out on "Floyd's Hill" running across Almont and Locust streets (see Almont St.). It was later extended as part of a proposed development planned by the Winthrop Land Trust for a portion of the Playstead area (see Winthrop Playstead).
Crystal Cove Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Crystal Cove historically had a gravel bed resulting in crystal clear water. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Cutler St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Elisha Cutler (1789-1862). Cutler & Tewksbury was a shipping office offering their services as lighterman (a worker who operaters a flat-bottom barge) and ballast inspectors. Abijab R. Tewksbury (1799-1875) was the son of Willam Tewksbury of Winthrop. Elisha Cutler's son, Elisha Cutler Jr. (1816-1849) moved to Iowa in 1839 and became a businessman owning flour and lumber mills. He also served as clerk of the district court in Van Buren county and in 1846 was elected as the first secretary of state of Iowa when it was admitted into the union. His brother, Edwin Cutler, came to Iowa in 1841, then emigrated to Oregon in 1852. Sadly, he was frozen to death of a flat boat on the Columbia river when in became locked in by ice. (info on Cutler family)
Deane Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Deane Winthrop (1623-1704) (Wikipedia). Street was laid out on land purchased in 1649 by Deane Winthrop from the owners of the original allotment of land in what would become Winthrop. The City of Boston purchased the land in 1866 with the intent of locating a state hospital for the insane on the property. The plan never materialized, with hospital instead located in Danvers. In 1883 the land was purchased by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company, which in addition to his 1878 purchase of Great Head/Cottage Hill, made him largest land owner in the town. The development was laid out by the civil engineering firm of Whitman & Breck, which would become Whitman & Howard in 1885, with Winthrop resident Channing Howard as co-founder (see Beacon St.).
Delby's Corner (Google: Street View, Map)
Ernest A. Del Bianco (1912-2002) was the former owner of Delby's Spa.
Deepwater St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. Street is on land purchased and developed by Alpheus P Blake in 1884. (see Triton Ave.)
Dix St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street was laid out on land owned jointly by Orlando Lewis and Orlando Belcher. Possibly named for the Dix family, one of the oldest in New England. Edward and Jane (Wilkinson) Dix came from England on the fleet with Governor Winthrop in 1630. They settled in Watertown. Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887) (Wikipedia), one of their descendants, was an American activist on behalf of the indigent insane (Life of Dorothea Lynde Dix, 1891, ebook).
Dolphin Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845. See Coral Ave.
Douglas St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Street laid out on land owned by the Douglass family (Alexander and Angelina) in the late 1800's.
Edgar Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
"Street laid out on land owned by James M. Belcher." (CH)
Edgehill Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic. Street laid out on land owned by Dr. Samuel Ingalls (see Ingleside Park).
Egleton Park (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. On land in the Cottage Park section of town (see Cottage Park Rd.).
Edward St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Edward Floyd (1809-1879), one of Winthrop's founding fathers and major local political figure during the mid 19th century. He built a house in 1842 near Edward St. that still stands (210 Main St.). Edward Floyd served on the first board of selectman as the first Town Treasurer. In 1852, Floyd's house was one of 45 dwellings in the entire town. Edward Floyd's widow Lucretia lived here as late as the early 1900's. (info on Floyd family).
Eleanor Ct. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Elliot St. (Google: Street View, Map)
George B. Elliot. The Elliot in real estate and brokerage firm Elliot & Whittier that purchased and developed a 45 acre tract on Point Shirley formerly owned by the Revere Copper Company.
Elmer Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street runs through a portion of the 48 acres of land Edward G. Loring (see Loring Rd.) and George B. Emerson (see Emerson Rd.) purchased in Winthrop in 1847.
Elmwood Ave. (Google: Street View, Map), Elmwood Court (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly for Elm trees. Street was laid out on land owned by Henry M. Belcher and M. Austin Belcher.
Emerson Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
George B. Emerson (1797-1881). Street runs through a portion of the 48 acres of land George Emerson and Edward G. Loring (see Loring Rd.) purchased in Winthrop. Both built estates. Emerson was an educator and pioneer of women's education (Wikipedia), and the cousin of Ralph Waldo Emerson. In addition he was a noted naturalist authoring the book, “A Report on the Trees and Shrubs Growing Naturally in the Forests of Massachusetts”. He was also was the mastermind of the establishment of the Arnold Arboretum in 1872. After the deaths of Emerson (1882), and Loring (1890), the land was used as golf course for a short time. In 1896 the streets were laid out for development following the fairways. The Emerson's daughter Lucy married Judge John Lowell (1824-1897) (Wikipedia).
Enfield Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street laid out on land owned by Dr. Samuel Ingalls (see Ingleside Park).
Fairview St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Until 1900 had been called Inskip St after the evangelical Methodist preacher, Rev. John A. Inskip.
Faunbar Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Faun Bar is a name for a long spit of land extening from the eastern shore of Deer Island. Parts are exposed at low tide. Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Floyd St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Floyd family. The Floyd family connection to the Winthrop area dates back to Captain John Floyd (1638-1702) who moved with his wife Sarah (Doolittle) in 1680 to Rumney Marsh. (info on Floyd family). Street was laid out on land purchased from the City of Boston in 1883 by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company (see Deane Ave.).
Foam St. (Google: Street View, Map )
Topographic. Street is on land purchased and developed by Alpheus P Blake in 1884. (see Triton Ave.)
Forrest St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Edwin Forrest (1806–1872), prominent nineteenth-century American Shakespearean actor (Wikipedia) (CH). Originally called Reddy St. (name source unknown)
Frances St. (Google: Street View, Map)
"Named for a well-known lady living there." (CH). Originally called San Pedro St. Land was owned by Charles E Steveson who traveled in California (see Pico Ave.)
Franklin St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly Benjamin Franklin. Street is on land that was owned by the Winthrop Land Trust and laid out for a planned development of a portion of the Playstead area (see Harvard St.).
Fremont St. (Google: Street View, Map)
John C. Frémont (1830-1890) (Wikipedia) was an American military officer, explorer, and politician who became the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. He lost to James Buchanan.
George St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Street traverses land owned by Samuel L. George. The George family in Winthrop dates to the mid-1800s, having moved from Vermont. Alphonso W. George was a Winthrop Selectman (1897-1898)
Girdlestone St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Street traverses land owned by Samuel Girdlestone. On it ran the Winthrop Coal Oil Co. producing kerosene and napthta. It closed in 1871.
Golden Dr. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is located on land that was owned by the United States and used as a fort (see Fort Banks).
Governors Dr. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is located on land that was owned by the United States and used as a fort (see Fort Banks).
Grand View Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographic The street was laid out as part of a development on Point Shirley by Alpheus P. Blake (see Triton Ave.).
Grovers Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Jotham Grover (1659-?) was the son-in-law of Deane Winthrop. Jotham married Margret Winthrop (1660-1695). Street was laid out on land purchased from the City of Boston in 1883 by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company (see Deane Ave.).
Hale Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Samuel W. Hale (1823-1891) (Wikipedia). In 1884, the former governor of New Hampshire, along with former Maine governor Joseph R. Bodwell, provided financial backing to Alpheus Blake for the purchase and development of land on Point Shirley.
Harbor View Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Harvard St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly for either Harvard University or John Harvard (1607-1638) (Wikipedia). Street is on land that was owned by the Winthrop Land Trust and is one of several that was planned for a development of a portion of the Playstead area (see Winthrop Playstead)
Hawthorn Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Likely named for the hawthorn family of trees and shrubs. The other street in the Atlantic Wave development (see Beach Rd.) is named Myrtle Ave.
Hermon St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Hermon B. Tewksbury (1827-1905) had a retail milk business, and ran a small farm in Winthrop. He also served on the town's Board of Selectmen, and as it's Assessor (info on Hermon B. Tewksbury).
Highland Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street was laid out on land purchased from the City of Boston in 1883 by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company (see Deane Ave.).
Highlands Pier (Google: Map)
Structure formerly located in the ocean at the end of Temple Ave. off Grovers Ave. (more on Winthrop Highlands Pier).
Hillside Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Hutchinson St. (Google: Street View, Map)
(ch) Thomas Hutchinson (1711-1780) was a businessman, historian, and a prominent Loyalist politician in Massachusetts before the American Revolution. He served as lieutenant governor and then governor from 1758 to 1774, the last royal governor (Wikipedia).
- Captain Edward Hutchinson (16131675) was an early land holder in Pullen Point having purchased the allotments of Edward Bates (then owned by John Leverett), and Ralph Hudson.
Ingleside Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Dr. Samuel Ingalls (1818-1884). (see Ingleside Park).
Irwin St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Samuel G. Irwin (born 1827). Born in Nova Scotia, he initially served on and commanded merchant ships. As a Captain in 1866, he survived a ship's sinking, and was able to save the whole crew. In 1867 he quit the sea and with his wife settled in Winthrop. In 1874 he purchased the foreclosed Winthrop Horse Railroad, and then launched the narrow guage steam powered Boston, Winthrop & Point Shirley Railroad. It 1883 it merged with the Boston, Winthrop and Shore Railroad. Samuel was active in town as a real estate dealer and insurance agent, and served as a selectman, collector of taxes, and assessor (info on Samuel Irwin). See also "Notable"
James Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
James M. Belcher (1811-1887). Street is laid out on land he owned. James was one of ten of children of Joseph Belcher, Jr. and Nancy (Burrill). James married Louisa Sale in 1837. Louisa Sale was the daughter of Deacon John Sale, a delegate to the Provincial Congress and a representative to the Massachusetts General Court. His farm at Beachmont played an important role in the first naval battle of the Revolutionary War, known as the Battle of Chelsea Creek, in 1775 (Wikipedia).
Jefferson St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). Third president of the United States (Wikipedia).
Jerald St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Johnson Ave. (Google: Street View, Map), Johnson Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
Benjamin Johnson (1821-1906) was an early home owner on the street. He was a merchant who operated a meat stall in Faneuil Hall in Boston. Benjamin and his wife Harriet adopted a girl who named Harriet "Hattie" Mary Johnson. She attended the New England Conservatory of Music, and outside of school, sang in music halls. Noticed by the well-known composer and conductor John J. Braham, she began a career that lead her to star in a number of successful comic operas, Edwardian musical comedies, and comic plays in New York, Boston, Philadelphia and London during the 1880s and 1890s (Wikipedia).
Kay St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown .Street laid out on land owned and farmed by Benjamin Paine in the mid-1800's.
Kennedy Dr. (Google: Street View, Map), Kennedy Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
John F. Kennedy (1809-1865). 36th president of the United States (Wikipedia). Street is located on land that was owned by the United States and used as a fort (see Fort Banks).
Lewis Ave. (Google: Street View, Map), Lewis Terrace (Street View, Map)
Orlando E. Lewis. See Lewis Lake Park.
Lincoln St. (Google: Street View, Map), Lincoln Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865). Sixteenth president of the United States (Wikipedia).
Linden St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly for Linden trees. Street is laid out on land owned by Hermon B. Tewksbury (1827-1905). He was a director on the Boston, Winthrop & Point Shirley Railroad.
Locust St. (Google: Street View, Map), Locust Way (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly for Locust trees. Streets were laid out on "Floyd's Hill" (land owned by Deacon David Floyd (1807-1895) in 1875. See Almont St.
Lorean Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Loring Rd. (Google: Street View, Map), Loring Terrace (Google: Street View, Map)
Edward G. Loring (1802-1890). Street runs through a portion of the 48 acres of land Loring and George B. Emerson (see Emerson Rd.) purchased in Winthrop. Both built estates on their land. Loring was a Massachusetts judge who ignited controversy in Massachusetts and the North by ordering escaped slaves Thomas Sims and Anthony Burns to be returned to slavery under the federal Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 (Wikipedia).
Lowell Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
John Lowell (1824-1897) (Wikipedia). Lowell was a federal judge in Boston. He was appointed to separate judgeships by Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Rutherford B. Hayes. In 1853, Lowell married Lucy Emerson, the daughter of George Emerson (see Emerson Rd.)
Madison Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
James Madison (1751-1836). Fourth president of the United States  (Wikipedia).
Magee's Corner (Google: Street View, Map)
Edward Augustus Magee (1853-1907). Magee opened and ran a grocery store for 30 years on this corner. Initially a milkman, he also was the first person to carry the mail in Winthrop. He later served as a town Treasurer and Assessor.
Main St. (Google: Street View)
One of the first streets in town coming from Breed's Island (now Orient Heights).
Maple Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of two streets named after trees in the Court Park section of town in honor of former land owner, and noted naturalist George B. Emerson (see Emerson Rd.)
Marshall St. (Google: Street View)
Named for an early resident (CH)
Maryland Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is laid on land that was the locattion of Taft's Hotel, later the Point Shirley Club.
Mermaid Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845. See Coral Ave. (more of Ocean Spray)
Metcalf Square (Google: Street View, Map)
Richard F. Metcalf (see Veterans Memorial page).
Moore St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly early summer residents (CH). On land owned by Charles S. Tewksbury (see Charles St.)
Morton St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Mugford St. (Google: Street View, Map)
James Mugford, Jr. - Continental Navy, Revolutionary War - commanded the schooner Franklin off Boston.On May 17, 1776 he captured the British ship Hope loaded with vitally needed cargo of military stores and powder, and took his prize into Boston, running under the noses of the British fleet lying in the outer harbor. (see James Mugford Memorial)
Myrtle Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Likely named for the myrtle family of trees and shrubs. The other street in the Atlantic Wave development (see Beach Rd.) is named Hawthorn Ave.
Nahant Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street was laid out on purchased and developed by the William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company in 1883 from the City of Boston (see Deane Ave.).
Neptune Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845 (See Coral Ave.).
Nevada St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unkown.
North Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical (see South St.). Two dead end streets laid out on the property of Albert Richardson. In 1848, Richardson inaugurated a horse-drawn carriage service from Point Shirley to Maverick Square in East Boston. He also served as a Selectman in the late 1800’s.
Oceanview St. (Google: Street View, Map), Oceanview Way (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Laid out on land owned by Samuel Belcher (see Belcher St.)
Orlando Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Orlando F. Belcher and Orlando E. Lewis. Street is on the border of the land owned by the two developers. See Cottage Park Rd., and Lewis Ave.
Otis St. (Google: Street View, Map)
James Otis, Sr. (Wikipedia) (1702–1778) was a prominent lawyer in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. His sons James Otis, Jr.  (Wikipedia)  and Samuel Allyne Otis (Wikipedia) also rose to prominence, as did his daughter Mercy Otis Warren  (Wikipedia). James Otis was a contemporary of Governor John Winthrop, and is said to have summered in Winthrop as did John Hancock.
Overlook Dr. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street is located on land that was owned by the United States and used as a fort (see Fort Banks).
Paine St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Benjamin Paine. Street was laid out on land owned and farmed by Benjamin Paine in the mid-1800's.
Palmyra St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street was laid out of land owned by Dr. Samuel Ingalls (see Ingleside Park).
Park Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Pauline St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Augusta Pauline Ingalls. Street is in land donated to the town by Dr. Samuel Ingalls (see Ingleside Park).
Payne's Corner (Google: Street View, Map)
Sylvanus Payne (born 1822). Payne was a tanner and currier who lived and had a shop at this corner. He also served as a Selectman in the 1860s (info on Sylvaus Payne).
Payson St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Rev. Phillips Payson (1736-1801). Congregational minister from Chelsea lead an armed group of parishioners into battle at Lexington in 1775. (see Religion and the Founding of the American Republic, Library of Congress)
Pearl Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845. See Coral Ave. (more on Ocean Spray)
Perkins St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Charles H. Perkins. The Perkins built a house on land they purchased from the Tewksbury's. (see Charles St.)
Pico Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Pico Ave. was laid out on land from the estate of Charles E. Stevenson (1833-1909). He is said to have spent some time in the U.S. West and is credited with naming this street after either Pio Pico, the last Mexican Governor of California or perhaps more likely the Pico House Hotel, built in 1870 and located in Los Angeles. The land earlier had been owned by Dr. Charles S. Carter.
The Pit (Google: Map)
Term used to describe former low-lying area and pond between Pauline and Hermon streets. (more on The Pit).
Playstead (Google: Map)
Term used in the late 1800s and early 1900s to describe the land that now includes Lewis Lake Park, the Winthrop Golf Course, Miller Field, Little League Field, the Middle/High School and its surrounding baseball fields. (more on Playstead).
Pleasant St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unkown. Laid out by Hiram Plummer (see Plummer Ave.).
Plummer Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Hiram Plummer (1787-1864), Became one of the first Selectman in town in 1852. His son-in-law was Charles L. Bartlett (see Bartlett Ave.).
Pond St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street was laid out on purchased and developed by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company from the City of Boston in 1883 (see Deane Ave.).
Pratt St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Lieutenant Thomas Pratt. The Pratt family in New England dates to the 1600s (info on Pratt family, pg 1576) first in Malden, then Chelsea. What is now Point Shirley was originally part of the Deane Winthrop Farm. It was willed to Ensign Joseph Belcher and Hannah (Bill), then to Lieutenant Thomas Pratt. The land was purchased in 1752 by Henry Atkins, Ezekiel and Thomas Goldthwait, and four associates to establish a fishing station, which they named Point Shirley after the Royal Governor William Shirley (see History of Chelsea ).
Prospect Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Putnam St. (Google: Street View, Map), Putnam Place (Google: Street View, Map)
Henry Putnam. Street was laid out next to his land.
Quincy Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Quincy, Mass. was the home of William B. Rice. His Winthrop Shore Land Company purchased the land from the Highlands from the City of Boston in 1883 (see Deane Ave.).
Read St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Edmund S. Read. He was a selectman in the town in 1888.
Revere St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. One of the first streets in the town.
Rice Wharf
William B. Rice (1840-1909) (see Rice Wharf Civic Memorial page).
River Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street runs along what had been called Fisher's Creek, now Lewis Lake.
Russell St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is on land that was the location of the Car Shed for the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad.
Sagamore Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Sagamore is anglicized version of the Indian word for king, Sachem,. Nanepashemet (died 1619) was a Great Sachem that ruled a large part of what is now eastern Massachusetts. He has three sons Wonohaquaham (Sagamore John), Montowampate (Sagamore James), and Wenepoykin (Sagamore George). Only Wenepoykin survived a small pox epidemic, and in 1650 took over as the Great Sachem. After years of lost land claims all over his family's domain, and cases stalled in court for years, Wenepoykin joined with Metacomet (King Philip) in the war for Mother Earth (King Philip's War). He was taken prisoner in 1675, sold into slavery, and shipped to Barbados. There he spent eight years enslaved. Eventually he was returned to Natick in 1684, and died a few months later.  (Wikipedia).
Sargent St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Sargent family. John Sargent Tewksbury (1774-1837) had a house on this land dating to the early 1800s. He was the son of James Tewksbury (1746-1800) and Mary Sargent (1749-1839). She was a descendant of William Sargent who came from England and settled in Malden in the 1600s.
Seafoam Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845 (See Coral Ave.).
Seaview Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street laid out on land owned by Josiah Floyd
Seal Harbor Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street laid out on land of the the former Fort Heath.
Sewall Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Samuel Sewall (1652-1730) was a judge, businessman, and printer in early Massachusetts, best known for his involvement in the Salem witch trials (Wikipedia). In 1687 Judge Samuel Sewall became a neighbor of Deane Winthrop when he settled on Hog Island (now Orient Heights). The street was laid out on land purchased and developed by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company from the City of Boston in 1883 (see Deane Ave.).
Seymour St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Eliza M. Seymour. Wife of Orlando E. Lewis (see Lewis Lake Park) from Hardin County, Ohio. Street is on land owned by Lewis.
Sheryl Lane (Google: Street View, Map)
Named for Sheryl Freedland. George and Marilyn Freedland owned the only house on Sheryl Lane, where they raised their two children, Sherrie and Rick. Street is on land of the former Cottage Park Hotel.
Shirley St. (Google: Street View, Map)
William Shirley (1694–1771) was the longest-serving governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay (Wikipedia). Shirley helped to establish a cod fishery in Winthrop in 1753 (see Pratt St.).
Short St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street was next to the Ingalls Railroad Station. A stairway still leads to Hermon St.
South Main St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
South Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical (see North Ave.).
The Strand (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Strand definition: the land bordering a body of water.
Sturgis St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Samuel Sturgis. In 1812, he purchased about two thirds of Point Shirley where he established the a saltworks.
Summit Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street was laid out on land purchased and developed by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company from the City of Boston in 1883 (see Deane Ave.).
Sunnyside Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street was laid out on land from the estate of Charles E. Stevenson. See Pico Ave.
Sunset Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street is laid out on land that had been owned by Walter Van Wagner Lawton (1825-1888). Lawton was a coal operator and merchant. He was involved in early efforts to electrify the railroad in Winthrop, and was active in efforts to build the Cape Cod Ship Canal.
Surfside Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical.
Tafts Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Orray Augustus Taft (1817-1893). Builder and proprietor of the famous Taft’s Hotel and Restaurant. Street runs through land he owned on Point Shirley. (more on Taft's Hotel)
Taylor St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Temple Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
John Temple (1731-1798) was the first British consul-general to the United States and the only British diplomat to have been born in what later became the United States (Wikipedia). He married Elizabeth Bowdoin, the daughter of Massachusetts Governor James Bowdoin. Their daughter, Elizabeth, married Massachusetts Lieutenant Governor Thomas Lindall Winthrop, the 3rd great grandson of John Winthrop..
Terrace Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Located on Cottage Hill, formerly known as Great Head. One of the streets laid out in 1888 by Whitman & Howard on land owned by Willam B. Rice (see Beacon St.).
Tewksbury St. (Google: Street View, Map)
John W. Tewksbury (1797-1884) (info on Tewksbury family, p 1678). Street is laid out on land owned by John W. Tewksbury, and his son, Charles S. Tewksbury (1824-1873). They both built houses and farmed on the land before subdividing it for development.
Thornton Park (Google: Street View, Map), Thornton St. (Google: Street View, Map)
John Wingate Thornton (1818-1878). He was a lawyer, historian, antiquarian, book collector and author (Wikipedia). Streets are laid out on land formerly owned by Thornton.
Tileston Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Tileston C. Power. Edgar F Power named the street for his father. Edgar (born 1868) was a developer and builder in Winthrop. He was Republican State Representative in the early 1920s. He was active at the Charles River Speedway owning horses.
Townsend Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Possibly because it is very near the end of the town. Street is laid on land that was the location of Taft's Hotel, later the Point Shirley Club.
Trident Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr. Samuel Ingalls in 1845. See Coral Ave.
Triton Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Triton Ave. was given its Greek mythological name (messenger of the sea) by Alpheus P. Blake as part of development of land he purchased on Point Shirley in 1884. Alpheus Blake was born in Orange, New Hampshire in 1832. He later moved to Pittsfield, NH, then Boston, and eventually Winthrop. He his known as the founder of Hyde Park (Wikipedia). Described as a shrewd land speculator and railroad developer, his accomplishments included founding the Boston Land Company, chartering two railroads, "The Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad" and the "Eastern Junction, Broad Sound Pier & Point Shirley Railroad", and was also at one time president of New England Brick Company. Point Shirley's was orginally part of what was called the Deane Winthrop Farm. In 1753 it was purchased from Thomas Pratt (see Pratt St.) for a fishing station, and them named Point Shirley. In 1808 it was purchased by Russel Sturgis to become a salt works. In 1844 it became the home of the Revere Copper Works. In 1884 the land was purchased for development by Alpheus Blake, with financial backing from former New Hampshire governor, Samuel W. Hale, and former Maine governor Joseph R. Bodwell. Blake was also involved in filling and development of Orient Heights and Beachmont. Mr. Blake had a winter home in Florida where he was connected with the company that built the Jacksonville St Augustine & Indian River Railroad. The town of Blake (now South Daytona) was named in his honor.
Underhill St. (Google: Street View, Map)
E.T. Underhill. The Underhills built a house on land they purchased from the Tewksbury's. Elihu T. Underhill was a Boston business man, and was a chairman of the Board of Trustees of Tewksbury Memorial Chapel in Winthrop.
Upland Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. Street was laid out on purchased and developed by William B. Rice's Winthrop Shore Land Company from the City of Boston in 1883 (see Deane Ave.).
Veterans Rd. (Google: Street View, Map)
Street follows the path of the railroad bed.
Villa Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Villa Ave. (and Buckthorn Terrace) are laid out on land of the Beacon Villa Estate, a 20-room Victorian mansion that initally was a private home with stables and servants quarters. Later it became the home of convicted financial agent C. F. King, a sanatorium for convalescents and invalids, and a rooming house and restaurant. The estate was purchased by Orlando Belcher in the late 1800s and the land subdivided. The mansion was demolished in 1962.
Vine Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Wadsworth Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
John Wadsworth (b. 1820). Street laid out on land owned by Jennie E. Wadsworth, the daughter of John Wadsworth (see Wadsworth Building).
Waldemar Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street was laid out of land owned by Dr. Samuel Ingalls (see Ingleside Park).
Walden St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Edwin Walden (1818-1889) was the 13th Mayor of Lynn, Mass., as well as an Alderman, State Representative, and Water Commissioner (Walden Pond in Lynn). He was also the second president (1877-1889) of the Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Narrow Gauge Railroad (Wikipedia). Street follows the path of the railroad line.
Washington Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
George Washington (1732-1799). First president of the United States (Wikipedia).
Wave Way Ave. (Google: Street View)e
One of the streets laid out in the Ocean Spray development by Dr Samuel Ingalls in 1845. See Coral Ave.
Wheelock St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street laid out on land owned by Dr. Samuel Ingalls (see Ingleside Park).
Whittier St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Eugene P. Whittier. The Whittier in the real estate and brokerage firm Elliot & Whittier that purchased and developed a 45 acre tract on Point Shirley formerly owned by the Revere Copper Company.
Williams St. (Google: Street View, Map)
William Francis Bartlett (1840-1876) (Wikipedia), was a Union General in the Civil War (more of W.F. Bartlett). Born in Winthrop (see Bartlett Rd.)
Willis Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown.
Willow Ave. (Google: Street View, Map), Willow Terrace (Google: Street View, Map),
Name source unknown.
Winthrop Shore Dr. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topograpical (Wikipedia). One of the eight ocean parkways proposed by Olmsted landscape architect Charles Eliot in 1897 for the Metropolitan Parks Commission. Land was acquired for the parkway in 1899, and construction was largely completed in 1900. The parkway is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Winthrop St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Topographical. One of the first streets in the town.
Wilshire St. (Google: Street View, Map)
Name source unknown. Street laid out on land owned and farmed by Benjamin Paine in the mid-1800's.
Woodside Ave. (Google: Street View, Map)
William and Harriet Wood. See Woodside Park.
Wyman St. (Google: Map)
Named "for the well known Wyman family coming to Pt. Shirley in early days, marrying our Winthrop girls and so, happily with. us for many years". Eliphaz Wyman II (1780-1856) married Mary Elizabeth Tewksbury (1786-1862) in 1804 and settled on Point Shirley.
HOME | Veterans | Wars and Forts | Civic | Schools | Streets and Corners | People |
Storefronts | Hotels | Maps | Books | Search | Sources |
Additions, Corrections, Comments? Please email contact@winthropmemorials.org